Friday, November 23, 2018

GANASOWADA TO CANASAWACTA - Digital copy from Dropbox

Get a free digital copy of my article from Dropbox

Windsor, Donald A.  Ganasowada to Canasawacta.  Journal of the Chenango County Historical Society 2018 Summer; 7: 107-112.

by using on this link. 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/l1ouyuexv5jvoud/Canasawacta_Windsor.pdf?dl=0

Saturday, November 3, 2018

Journal of the Chenango County Historical Society


JOURNAL OF THE CHENANGO COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Donald A. Windsor

A good way to explore Chenango County is to read about its history in the Journal of the Chenango County Historical Society. The 2018 issue has just been published. Here is a list of the articles it contains.

Editorial—Researching and Writing - Donald A. Windsor

Letter to the Editor: CCC Camps in Pharsalia - Henry Drexler

Letter to the Editor: Indian Castle and CCC Camp in Greene - Peg Ross

March Etheridge, Civil War Veteran: 11 th U.S. Colored Heavy Artillery - Sharon M. Donahe

Chenango County in the Great War: How Four Local Soldiers Experienced World War I - Sara C. Evenson 
 
A Ship with Her Own Private Rabbit’s Foot”: The USS Chenango in the Second World War - Edward J. Erickson 
 
The Smyrna Citizens’ Band Celebrates its 100 th Anniversary – Marilyn Fuller 

The “Bixby Pharsalia Farm” - Henry J. Drexler 
 
A Ruin Revived - Joscelyn Godwin 
 
Unmasking The Beaver Meadow Gang - Joscelyn Godwin 
 
They Are Back—The Migrant Workers - Marilyn Fuller 
 
Chenango County Girl Scouts - A. Gail Merian 
 
The Restoration of Stewart’s Corners CemeteryDale F. Utter and Christina H. Utter 
 
Bonesetter Ira “Doc” Sweet - Clay Welch 
 
Ganasowada to Canasawacta - Donald A. Windsor

The Journal is available at our CCHS Museum book store in Norwich, Silver and Rexford streets, for $20.00 (10% discount for members). It would make a dandy Christmas present.

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Saturday, November 18, 2017

KINGS SETTLEMENT CHURCH -- ITS END TIMES


KINGS SETTLEMENT CHURCH – ITS END TIMES

Donald A. Windsor

Once the roof caves in, a building is doomed. The roof of the Kings Settlement Church fell in a few years ago. On 9 November 2017, I took these 3 photos.

Front, west side. #2794


North side. #2792


South side. #2793


A photo of the Church in much better condition appears in this article, along with its history.

Scott, Patricia F. ; Decker, Janet. The Kingsettlement Methodist Church of North Norwich.
The Evening Sun 2003 December 12 Friday: 11.

An earlier article, recently reprinted is:

King, Ada A history of Kings Settlement Church. Journal of the Chenango County
Historical Society 2017 Summer; 6: 74-79.

An article on the hamlet as well as the church is:

Hazard, Mildred E. King’s Settlement. In: Anon. Next Stop Galena. Historical Perspective
of North Norwich, New York, 1849-1999. North Norwich, NY: Sesquicentennial Book/Planning Committee. 1999. Pages 52-54.

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Monday, November 13, 2017

DEVIL'S WALKING STICK (= HERCULES' CLUB)


DEVIL’S WALKING STICK (= HERCULES’ CLUB) IN NORTH NORWICH

Donald A. Windsor

Devil’s Walking Stick, also known as Hercules’ Club (Aralia spinosa), was found by Pete Bida on Thursday afternoon 9 November 2017 on our Bullthistle hike in the Whaupaunaucau State Forest in North Norwich, growing in a small grove along Trail 13. This member of the Araliacae (Ginseng) Family is native to southern New York State, down to Florida and west to Texas (Symonds).

It has been reported as vouchered (specimens in herbarium collection) from 11 counties in NYS on the New York Flora Association website. The closest are Delaware, Madison, and Oneida.


It grows as a tree or shrub and can attain a height of 35 feet. It is sold for horticultural purposes and the ones Pete found may be escapes.

Now that I have seen this plant I will be more alert for it in the future.

The flower display can be very impressive, as per a photo in Leopold’s book. It blooms in August, so I look forward to seeing it then.

Petrides lists (page 197) a close relative called “Devil’s Club” but in a separate genus and species, Oplopanax horridus, a northwestern plant with simple leaves and slender thorns. The leaf that Pete is holdinging the above photo has doubly compound leaves.

References consulted:

Leopold, Donald J. Aralia spinosa. In: Native Plants of the Northeast. Portland, OR: Timber Press. 2005. Pages 216-217.

New York Flora Association (NYFA) www.nyflora.org

Petrides, George A. Aralia spinosa Hercules-Club. In: A Field Guide to Trees and Shrubs. 2nd Edition. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin. 1972. Pages 128, 152-153.

Symonds, George W.D. ; Merwin, A.W. Hercules’ Club. In: The Shrub Identification Book. New York, NY: William Morrow & Co. 1963. Main Plates 92-94, Pages 258-260.

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Wednesday, October 11, 2017

BIGFOOT HAS A FAMILY!


BIGFOOT NOW HAS A FAMILY!

Donald A. Windsor

A male Bigfoot was spotted this spring in Plymouth. This photo was taken by me on 30 April 2017.



Now, just a week or so ago, his wife and child were spotted in Preston. This photo was snapped by Dave Harvey, who also told me about Mr. Bigfoot.



Apparently, they seem to enjoy Chenango County.

Exact locations of these sightings are not being disclosed because we want to protect the security of the Bigfoot family.

Authentication of the sightings remains elusive. However, here is a hint. If the videos were viewed, they would resemble the still photos.

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Thursday, September 7, 2017

SLUGS AS CARNIVORES


SLUGS AS CARNIVORES

Donald A. Windsor

As you watch slugs voraciously devour your garden plants, you probably regard them as herbivores. However, they do have a carnivorous side.

Slugs in the species Limax marginata are occasionally seen feasting on road-killed frogs and toads. On our Bullthistle hike Sunday morning 3 September 2017, we encountered this fest of slugs dining on a road-killed Red Eft (larval stage of the Red-spotted Newt).



The photo was snapped by Maryann Weiss on the Truck Trail through the Whaupaunaucau State Forest in North Norwich.

I have heard of using beer to attract slugs, but perhaps road-kill might work better.

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Friday, September 1, 2017

CHENANGO COUNTY HAS 7 HILLS ABOVE 2000 FEET


CHENANGO COUNTY HAS 7 HILLS ABOVE 2000 FEET

Donald A. Windsor

I knew that Chenango County has 6 hills above 2000 feet: 3 in Afton, 2 in Pharsalia, and 1 in Otselic (1).

However, there are 7. In mid August, 2017, I found one that I had missed.

This “new” one is in Pharsalia, east southeast of the southern sharp bend in Beardsley Road and west of County Road 42. It is on private property just east of the Perkins Pond State Forest.

High points are found by closely examining the United States Geological Survey topographic maps. I missed the 7th point because of the “1980” printed on the 1980 contour line. The 2000 contour line is too small to have its own printed designation.

So, now it is clear; we have 7 hills in Chenango County above 2000 feet. The highest is in Afton with over 2040 feet (2). Actually, there are two points over 2040 feet, but they are close together on the same hill. Thus, to be even more clear, we have 7 hills over 2000 feet, but have 8 points over 2000 feet.

To put it into perspective, all of the five counties surrounding Chenango (Madison, Otsego, Delaware, Broome, and Cortland) also have hills over 2000 feet.

Reference cited:

1. Windsor, Donald A. Souvenirs of Yesteryear. Exploring Chenango County, New York. Norwich, NY: Self published. 2008. Volume 4, pages 28-29.

2. Windsor, Donald A. The highest point in Chenango County. In: Souvenirs of Yesteryear. Exploring Chenango County, New York. Norwich, NY: Self published. 2008. Volume 1, pages 56-57. 

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